:::

Parents

:::

Children 6-10 years of age

En Español Haga Click Aquí  |  Para Português Clique Aqui

1

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. When will my child start getting permanent teeth?
  2. My child lost the baby teeth a few months ago and the new teeth have not grown in. Should I be worried?
  3. How can I prevent my child from getting cavities as he/she starts growing permanent teeth?
  4. When do children begin to floss their own teeth?
  5. Why are my child’s new front teeth more yellow than the baby teeth next to them?
  6. What can be done for my child who is still thumb sucking?
  7. Why does my child have two rows of teeth?
  8. Why does my child have a large space between the new front teeth?
  9. Do many children have missing teeth?
  10. Why do children need sealants?
  11. Does my child need a mouthguard for sports?
  12. If a child has bad primary teeth, will they have bad permanent teeth?

  1. When will my child start getting permanent teeth?

    Permanent Teeth

    The arrival of permanent teeth occurs at 6 years +/- 6 months. With the exception of the wisdom teeth, the last of the permanent teeth come in around 12 years of age.
    Tooth eruption can be variable. Girls tend to get teeth earlier than boys. However it is not so much the timing that is important as the sequence of tooth eruption. When individual teeth are delayed, this could indicate local problems. A good reason to see your dentist regularly is to have development supervised.

  2. My child lost the baby teeth a few months ago and the new teeth have not grown in. Should I be worried?

    Sometimes when the children lose a baby tooth the new tooth is right there and you can see it immediately. Sometimes it takes months for them to start coming into the mouth. This is related to many factors like the amount of space available for the tooth to grow, the position of the individual tooth, and even family traits.  Ask your dentist this question as your child loses the first tooth. Your dentist or hygienist can go over the radiographs of your child to tell you what to expect, and make you aware of any potential problems.
     
  3. How can I prevent my child from getting cavities as he/she starts growing permanent teeth?

    As children start school, they also start increasing their independence with daily habits and food choices in and out of the home. To insure your child continues to have healthy teeth and body:

    • Continue to supervise brushing with fluoride toothpaste twice a day. School age children who are supervised to brush develop less cavities than children who do it by themselves. As children’s bodies grow and so does their ability to spit, the amount of fluoride toothpaste is not as crucial. You can let them exercise some independence, but with supervision to insure the removal of plaque from all teeth. Disclosing tablets or rinses are very helpful to show them the areas where plaque is hard to reach.
    • Talk to your child about good food and beverage choices when they are at school. Plain milk and water should always be mentioned as the best drink choices. Discourage the habit of drinking sweet beverages routinely (soda, chocolate milk, fruit juices or energy drinks), as they increase their chances of getting cavities and becoming overweight.
    • As children grow older, encourage to minimize snacking between meals and teach children to choose fresh fruits and vegetables instead of snacks made from refined carbohydrates (like chips) or candy.
  4. When do children begin to floss their own teeth?

    4

    Flossing teeth is difficult. Children acquire these abilities at different rates. Studies with 7 to 8 year olds have shown that many of the children do not have the ability to self-floss at this time. Consequently, at about 8 to 10 years of age we suggest that children can be introduced to self-flossing. Begin by learning to floss the front teeth. Then, when they can do this well, begin to floss in the back of the mouth.
    Alternately, even young children can use flossers with a handle to make it easier to practice alone and gives easier access for parents to help.
    It is important to floss correctly. Your dental team can help you learn.

  5. Why are my child’s new front teeth more yellow than the baby teeth next to them?

    Newly erupted permanent teeth have large pulps and their enamel is more translucent than the very white opaque enamel of baby teeth. This makes them seem like they are more yellow in contrast. As the tooth develops more, the color will tend to look lighter and blend-in more with the surrounding teeth. As more permanent teeth grow next to each other, their color will also look more uniform and lighter. If you want your children’s teeth to look their whitest, brushing gently twice a day with fluoride toothpaste will remove the debris and stain that could make them look even more yellow, while keeping them healthy.
     
  6. What can be done for my child who is still thumb sucking?

    Most experts think that by 6 years of age, when the permanent teeth start to come in, is the proper age to treat the habit.
    We like to see the habit discontinued because it can push the new teeth into poor alignment. Finger sucking encourages the upper teeth to protrude. It also can be associated with poor speech, social stresses and other habits. These habits are treated with psychologically based programs and/or mouth appliances. Correction of the habit is sometimes not easy. Your dentist should be able to evaluate and recommend which method is most suited for your child’s individual situation.
     

  7. Why does my child have two rows of teeth?

    Two Rows of Teeth

    The most common site for this to occur is in the lower front tooth region. It happens in 30% of children. The appearance of two rows of teeth is due to the permanent teeth coming in behind the primary teeth. This is usually caused by a discrepancy between the size of the new teeth, and the space available for them to grow.
    Your dentist should be consulted. An x-ray may be needed to determine how much of the root of the primary tooth remains. Sometimes the primary teeth need removal but in many cases, if the primary teeth are already loose, they fall out after a few weeks.

  8. Why does my child have a large space between the new front teeth?

    A large space sometimes is noticed when the two upper front teeth come in. This space is called a diastema. The easy answer is that this is a normal part of jaw development. As more teeth arrive, the space tends to close. When the eye teeth arrive near the teenage years, the space is usually closed. For the most part, presence of a diastema before age 12 is usually an indication that the permanent teeth will have enough room to grow straight. However, there can be other causes for space between front teeth and the area may need x-ray investigation by your dentist to rule out any potential problems.
     
  9. Do many children have missing teeth?

    About 1 in 20 people have variations in the number of teeth. Some have extra teeth and some have missing teeth. Missing teeth are more common in the permanent dentition than in the primary set of teeth. Some people only have one or two missing teeth. There may be no apparent reason for this occurrence or it may be something that other family members have as well. Some people have numerous missing teeth. This could be related to some type of systemic condition.  Your dentist can help make a plan to manage the space so the children can retain proper function in spite of the missing teeth; he/she can also coordinate the treatment with the orthodontist to properly manage the space and possible replacement in the long term.
  10. Why do children need sealants?

    Sealants When teeth first come into the mouth they are more at risk for tooth decay. The permanent teeth that benefit the most from getting sealants are the permanent molars. The first molars arrive at about 6 years of age and often have deep grooves on the chewing surfaces. Tooth brushing is often not enough to clean these grooves properly, so over the years many of these new molars will get tooth decay. The sealant is a protective hard coating that fills-in the deep grooves in the chewing surfaces of the back teeth, so that food cannot collect in them. The smooth surface also makes the tooth easier to clean. This prevents them from decaying! Sealants have a long track of being safe, and they are the most effective way to prevent cavities in the chewing surfaces of back teeth. Sealants are usually placed on permanent teeth, but if children are at risk of developing new cavities in the chewing surfaces of primary back teeth, they can benefit from having sealants placed on their primary teeth too.
  11. Does my child need a mouthguard for sports?

    Mouthguards help lessen injuries to mouth and teeth. They are used in many sports where there is a possibility of injury.
    Mouthguards are best fitted from a mold of your child's teeth or they can be purchased commercially. The custom fitted mouthguard is a superior fit. This makes it easier for the child to talk wearing the appliance and it offers better protection. However, for a child in the 6 to 9 age bracket, teeth are constantly falling out and being replaced. It may be more practical for this age group to purchase the commercial guards. The more expensive fitted guards can be purchased when all the permanent teeth are in place. Note that mouthguards can also be made and strongly recommended for children wearing braces.
     

  12. If a child has bad primary teeth, will they have bad permanent teeth?

    This does not have to be the case. To have dental decay we need teeth, germs in the mouth and sweet foods. If germs collect in large numbers and sweet foods are eaten regularly and allowed to remain in the mouth without being brushed away, we have a recipe for tooth decay. Sadly, bad habits like eating sweet foods and drinks too often and not brushing with fluoride toothpaste can often persist for a long time and after causing cavities in primary teeth, go on to cause cavities on permanent teeth as they come into the mouth. Children who have cavities on their baby teeth have a lot more chances of having cavities on their permanent teeth. But a lifestyle change with a nutritious diet that limits sugar, proper brushing twice a day with fluoride toothpaste, and regular dental visits can change the mouth environment completely, giving the new teeth a chance to grow healthy. So, bad permanent teeth do not have to follow bad primary teeth.


Niños de 6 a 10 años de edad
 
1

FAQ

  1. ¿Cuándo empezarán a salirle a mi hijo los dientes permanentes?
  2. Mi hijo perdió los dientes primarios hace unos meses y los nuevos dientes no han erupcionado aún ¿Debería estar preocupado?
  3. ¿Cómo puedo evitar que mi hijo tenga caries mientras comienzan a crecerle los dientes permanentes?
  4. ¿Cuándo empiezan los niños a usar hilo dental sin ayuda?
  5. ¿Por qué los nuevos dientes frontales de mi hijo son más amarillos que los dientes de bebé al lado de ellos?
  6. ¿Qué puedo hacer con mi hijo que se sigue succionando el dedo?
  7. ¿Por qué mi hijo tiene dos hileras de dientes?
  8. ¿Por qué mi hijo tiene un espacio grande entre los nuevos dientes frontales?
  9. ¿Muchos niños tienen dientes ausentes?
  10. ¿Por qué los niños necesitan selladores?
  11. ¿Necesita mi hijo un protector bucal para hacer deporte?
  12. Si un niño tiene malos dientes primarios, ¿tendrá malos dientes permanentes también?

  1. ¿Cuándo empezarán a salirle a mi hijo los dientes permanentes?

    Permanent Teeth

    La erupción de los dientes permanentes ocurre a los 6 años y medio aproximadamente. Con la excepción de las muelas del juicio, el último de los dientes permanentes erupciona alrededor de los 12 años de edad.
    El brote de los dientes puede ser variable. Las niñas tienden a tener dientes antes que los niños. Sin embargo, no es tanto el momento que es importante como la secuencia de erupción de los dientes. El retraso de los dientes individuales podría indicar problemas locales. Una buena razón para ver a su dentista regularmente es para tener un desarrollo supervisado.

  2. Mi hijo perdió los dientes primarios hace unos meses y los nuevos dientes no han erupcionado aún ¿Debería estar preocupado?

    A veces, cuando los niños pierden un diente primario, el diente nuevo está allí y se puede ver de inmediato. A veces se necesitan meses para que empiecen a erupcionar en boca. Esto está relacionado con muchos factores como la cantidad de espacio disponible para que el diente crezca, la posición del diente individual e incluso los rasgos de la familia. Aclare con su dentista esta pregunta cuando su hijo pierda el primer diente. Su dentista o higienista puede revisar las radiografías de su hijo para decirle qué esperar y hacerle consciente de cualquier problema potencial. 
  3. ¿Cómo puedo evitar que mi hijo tenga caries mientras comienzan a crecerle los dientes permanentes?

    A medida que los niños comienzan a ir a la escuela, también comienzan a aumentar su independencia con los hábitos diarios y las opciones de alimentos dentro y fuera del hogar. Para asegurarse de que su hijo continúe teniendo su cuerpo y dientes sanos:

    • Continúe supervisando el cepillado con pasta dental con fluoruro dos veces al día. Los niños en edad escolar que son supervisados mientras se cepillan los dientes, desarrollan menos caries que los niños que lo hacen por sí mismos. A medida que los cuerpos de los niños crecen, también lo hace su capacidad de escupir, y ahora la cantidad de pasta de dientes con fluoruro utilizada no es tan crucial. Usted puede dejar que ejerzan alguna independencia, pero con la supervisión para asegurar la eliminación de la placa en todos los dientes. Inculcarles el uso de tabletas o enjuagues es muy útil para mostrarles las áreas donde la placa es difícil de alcanzar.
    • Hable con su hijo sobre las opciones saludables de comida y bebida cuando están en la escuela. La leche normal y el agua deben ser siempre mencionadas como las mejores opciones de bebida. Evitar que creen el hábito de beber bebidas artificialmente enduzadas rutinariamente (refresco, leche de chocolate, jugos de frutas o bebidas energéticas), ya que aumentan sus posibilidades de obtener caries y sobrepeso.
    • A medida que los niños van creciendo, anímelos a minimizar los bocadillos entre comidas y enséñelos a preferir frutas y verduras frescas en vez de carbohidratos refinados, como papas fritas o dulces.
  4. ¿Cuándo empiezan los niños a usar hilo dental sin ayuda?

    4

    Usar el hilo dental es difícil. Los niños adquieren estas habilidades a diferentes ritmos. Estudios con niños de 7 a 8 años de edad han demostrado que muchos de ellos no tienen la capacidad de usar el hilo dental en esa etapa. En consecuencia, entre los 8 y 10 años de edad, sugerimos que a los niños se les empiece a enseñar a usar correctamente el hilo dental. Comience aprendiendo a usarlo en los dientes frontales. Después, cuando puedan hacerlo bien, que comiencen a aprender en la parte posterior de la boca.
    Alternativamente, incluso los niños pequeños pueden usar sedas con mango para que la práctica sola sea más sencilla y facilitar el acceso de los padres para ayudarlos.
    Es importante usar el hilo dental correctamente. Su equipo odontológico puede ayudarle a aprender.

  5. ¿Por qué los nuevos dientes frontales de mi hijo son más amarillos que los dientes de bebé al lado de ellos?

    Los dientes permanentes recién brotados tienen pulpas grandes y su esmalte es más translúcido que el esmalte opaco muy blanco de los dientes de leche. Esto hace que parezca que son más amarillos en contraste. A medida que el diente se desarrolla más, el color tenderá a parecer más claro y se mezclará más con los dientes circundantes. A medida que crecen los dientes permanentes uno al lado del otro, su color también se verá más uniforme y más claro. Si desea que los dientes de sus hijos se vean más blancos, que se los cepillen suavemente dos veces al día con pasta de dientes con fluoruro para eliminar los desechos y las manchas que podrían hacer que parezcan aún más amarillos, manteniéndolos sanos. 
  6. ¿Qué puedo hacer con mi hijo que se sigue succionando el dedo?

    La mayoría de los expertos piensan que a los 6 años de edad, cuando los dientes permanentes comienzan a entrar, es la edad adecuada para tratar el hábito.
    Nos gusta ver el hábito interrumpido porque puede empujar los dientes nuevos en mala alineación. La succión de los dedos alienta a los dientes superiores a sobresalir. También se puede asociar con el habla deficiente, tensiones sociales y otros hábitos. Estos hábitos se tratan con programas basados en la psicología y/o aparatos de la boca. La corrección del hábito muchas veces no es fácil. Su dentista debe ser capaz de evaluar y recomendar qué método es el más adecuado para la situación individual de su hijo. 

  7. ¿Por qué mi hijo tiene dos hileras de dientes?

    Two Rows of Teeth

    El sitio más común para que esto ocurra es en la región inferior de los dientes delanteros. Sucede en el 30% de los niños. La aparición de dos hileras de dientes se debe a que los permanentes entran detrás de los primarios. Esto suele ser causado por una discrepancia entre el tamaño de los dientes nuevos, y el espacio disponible para que crezcan.
    Debe consultar a su dentista. Una radiografía puede ser necesaria para determinar cuánto queda de la raíz del diente primario. A veces, los dientes primarios necesitan ser extraídos pero en muchos casos, si ya están flojos, se caen después de unas semanas.

  8. ¿Por qué mi hijo tiene un espacio grande entre los nuevos dientes frontales?

    Un espacio grande a veces se nota cuando los dos dientes delanteros superiores entran. Este espacio se llama un diastema. La respuesta fácil es que esta es una parte normal del desarrollo de la mandíbula. A medida que más dientes llegan, el espacio tiende a cerrarse. Cuando los caninos superiores erupcionan cerca de la adolescencia, el espacio suele estar cerrado lo cual les impide bajar correctamente hacia el arco dental. En su mayor parte, la presencia de un diastema antes de los 12 años suele ser una indicación de que los dientes permanentes tendrán suficiente espacio para alinearse. Sin embargo, puede haber otras causas para que haya un espacio entre los dientes delanteros y el área puede necesitar la investigación de la radiografía por su dentista para descartar cualquier problema potencial. 
  9. ¿Muchos niños tienen dientes ausentes?

    Aproximadamente 1 de cada 20 personas tiene variaciones en el número de dientes. Algunos tienen dientes extra y algunos tienen dientes ausentes. Los dientes faltantes son más comunes en la dentición permanente que en el conjunto primario de dientes. Algunas personas sólo tienen uno o dos dientes faltantes. No hay razón aparente para este hecho o incluso puede ser algo que otros miembros de la familia tengan también. Algunas personas tienen numerosos dientes ausentes. Esto podría estar relacionado con algún tipo de condición sistémica. Su dentista puede ayudar a hacer un plan para manejar el espacio para que sus hijos puedan conservar la función adecuada a pesar de los dientes ausentes; ellos también puede coordinar el tratamiento con el ortodoncista para manejar adecuadamente el espacio y posible reemplazo en el largo plazo.
  10. ¿Por qué los niños necesitan selladores?

    Sealants Cuando los dientes salen por primera vez en la boca aumenta el riesgo de desarrollar caries. Los dientes permanentes que se benefician más de obtener selladores son los molares. Los primeros molares salen a los 6 años de edad y a menudo tienen surcos profundos en las superficies de masticación. El cepillado de dientes muchas veces no es suficiente para limpiarlos correctamente, por lo que con el paso de los años muchos de estos nuevos molares podrían tener caries. El sellador es una protección de revestimiento duro que rellena las ranuras profundas en las superficies de masticación de los dientes posteriores, de modo que los alimentos no se puedan almacenar en ellos. La superficie lisa también hace que el diente sea más fácil de limpiar. ¡Esto impide que se deterioren! Los selladores tienen un largo trazo de seguridad, y son la forma más eficaz de prevenir las caries en las superficies de masticación de los dientes posteriores. Los selladores generalmente se colocan en los dientes permanentes, pero si los niños están en riesgo de desarrollar nuevas caries en las superficies de masticación de los molares primarios, pueden beneficiarse de tener selladores colocados en estos también.
  11. ¿Necesita mi hijo un protector bucal para hacer deporte?

    Los protectores bucales ayudan a disminuir las lesiones en la boca y los dientes. Se utilizan en muchos deportes donde existe la posibilidad de lesión.
    Los protectores bucales pueden ser hechos con un molde de sus dientes o se pueden comprar prefabricados en alguna tienda. El protector bucal hecho a la medida tiene una comodidad y un ajuste superior lo que hace que sea más fácil para el niño hablar al usar el aparato y ofrece una mejor protección. Sin embargo, para un niño de 6 a 9 años de edad, los dientes se caen constantemente para luego ser reemplazados. Puede ser más práctico para este grupo de edad comprar los protectores bucales en tiendas especializadas. Los protectores más caros se pueden comprar cuando todos los dientes permanentes están en su lugar. Tenga en cuenta que los protectores bucales también se pueden hacer y se recomienda ampliamente para los niños que usan brackets. 

  12. Si un niño tiene malos dientes primarios, ¿tendrá malos dientes permanentes también?

    Este no tiene que ser el caso. Para tener caries necesitamos dientes, gérmenes en la boca y alimentos dulces. Si los gérmenes se acumulan en grandes cantidades y se comen alimentos dulces regularmente para que luego se les permita permanecer en la boca sin ser cepillados, tendremos una buena receta para la caries. Lamentablemente, los malos hábitos, como comer alimentos y bebidas dulces con demasiada frecuencia y no cepillarse con pasta de dientes con fluoruro a menudo, pueden persistir durante mucho tiempo y después de causar caries en los dientes de leche, causarían caries en los permanentes cuando brotan en la boca. Los niños que tienen cavidades en sus dientes de leche tienen muchas más posibilidades de tener caries en sus dientes permanentes. Pero un cambio en el estilo de vida con una dieta nutritiva que limita el azúcar, el cepillado adecuado dos veces al día con pasta de dientes con fluoruro y las visitas al dentista de forma regular pueden cambiar el ambiente de la boca por completo, dando a los dientes una oportunidad de crecer sanamente. Por lo tanto, los dientes permanentes malos no tienen porque ser afectados por los dientes primarios malos.


Crianças de 6 a 10 anos de idade
 
1

FAQ

  1. Quando meu filho começará a ter dentes permanentes?
  2. Meu filho perdeu os dentes decíduos há alguns meses e os novos dentes ainda não cresceram. Devo me preocupar?
  3. Como posso previnir cáries no meu filho, a medida que inicia-se o nascimento dos dentes permanentes?
  4. Quando as crianças começam a passa o fio dental nos seus próprios dentes?
  5. Por que os dentes permanentes da frente do meu filho são mais amarelados do que os dentes decíduos ao lado?
  6. O que pode ser feito para o meu filho que ainda está chupando o dedo?
  7. Por que meu filho tem duas fileiras de dentes?
  8. Por que o meu filho tem um espaço largo entre os dentes permanentes anteriores?
  9. Muitas crianças têm dentes faltando?
  10. Por que as crianças precisam de selantes?
  11. Meu filho precisa de um protetor bucal para praticar esportes?
  12. Se uma criança tem dentes decídus ruins, ela também terá dentes permanentes ruins?

  1. Quando meu filho começará a ter dentes permanentes?

    Permanent Teeth

    O nascimento dos dentes permanentes ocorre aos 6 anos +/- 6 meses. Com exceção dos sisos, o último dente permanente a nascer ocorre em torno dos 12 anos de idade.

    A erupção dentária é variável. Os dentes nas meninas tendem a nascer mais cedo do que nos meninos. No entanto, não é tanto o momento que é importante, e sim a seqüência da erupção dentária. Quando ocorre atraso pode ser uma indicação de algum problemas local. Uma boa razão para visitar o seu dentista regularmente é ter o desenvolvimento supervisionado.

  2. Meu filho perdeu os dentes decíduos há alguns meses e os novos dentes ainda não cresceram. Devo me preocupar?

    Às vezes, quando as crianças perdem um dente decíduo, o dente novo já está nascendo e bem visível. Às vezes, leva-se meses para estes começarem a aparecerem na boca. Isso está relacionado a muitos fatores, como a quantidade de espaço disponível para o crescimento dentário, a posição do dente, e até mesmo dos traços da família. Pergunte esta questão ao seu dentista assim que o seu filho perder o primeiro dente. Seu dentista irá avaliar as radiografias do seu filho para então lhe informar o que esperar, e torná-lo ciente de quaisquer problemas em potenciail.
     
  3. Como posso previnir cáries no meu filho, a medida que inicia-se o nascimento dos dentes permanentes?

    À medida que as crianças começam a irem a escola, elas se tornarem mais independente. Elas tem seus próprios hábitos diários e começam a escolher o que irão comer dentro e fora de casa. Abaixo encontra-se umas dicas para garantir que o seu filho continue a ter dentes e corpo saudáveis.

    • Continue a supervisionar a escovação com pasta de dentes com flúor duas vezes por dia. Crianças que são supervisionadas durante a escovação desenvolvem menos cáries do que as crianças que escovam por si próprio. À medida que as crianças crescem, a sua habilidade em cuspir aumenta. Desta forma, a quantidade de pasta dental com flúor não é mais considerada crucial. Você pode deixá-los exercer alguma independência, mas com supervisão para garantir a remoção de placa de todos os dentes. Pastilhas ou bochechos reveladores são bastante úteis para mostrar as crianças as áreas de difícil acesso durante a escovação.
    • Converse com seu filho sobre boas opções de alimentos e bebidas quando estiverem na escola. Leite puro e água devem sempre ser mencionados como melhores opções de bebidas. Desaconselhe o hábito de beber bebidas doces rotineiramente (soda, leite com chocolate, sucos de frutas ou bebidas energéticas), uma vez que estas aumentam as chances de obter cáries e de ganhar de peso.
    • À medida que as crianças crescem, encoraje-as a diminuirem a quantidade de lanches entre as refeições; ensine-as a escolherem frutas e vegetais, ao invés de lanches feitos com carboidratos refinados (como batatas fritas) ou doces.
  4. Quando as crianças começam a passa o fio dental nos seus próprios dentes?

    4

    O uso do fio dental é difícil. As crianças adquirem esta habilidade em diferentes proporções. Estudos têm demonstrado que muitas das crianças de 7 a 8 anos de idade não têm a capacidade de passar o fio dental sozinhas. Consequentemente, sugerimos que as crianças de 8 a 10 anos sejam apresentadas ao uso do fio dental. Inicia-se aprendendo a passar fio dental nos dentes anteriores. E, ao desenvolver habilidade e destreza com o fio nestes dentes, inicia o uso do fio nos dentes posteriores da cavidade bucal.
    Alternativamente, crianças pequenas podem usar o fio dental como um instrumento de prática sozinhos, permitindo que os pais tenham acesso mais fácil para ajudá-los.
    É importante usar o fio dental corretamente. Sua equipe de odontologia pode ajudá-lo a aprender.

  5. Por que os dentes permanentes da frente do meu filho são mais amarelados do que os dentes decíduos ao lado?

    Os dentes permanentes têm polpas grandes e o seu esmalte é mais translúcido do que o esmalte dos dentes decíduos, que é branco opaco. Isto faz parecer que os dentes permanentes são mais amarelados. À medida que o dente se desenvolve, a cor tende a parecer mais clara, começando a se misturar com os dentes circundantes. Quanto mais os dentes permanentes se desenvolvem próximos uns aos outros, a sua cor também fica mais uniforme e clara. Se você quiser que o seu filho tenha dentes mais branco, uma escovação suave duas vezes por dia com pasta de dente com flúor irá remover os detritos e mancha, as quais poderiam torná-los mais amarelos, mantendo-os, desta forma saudáveis.
     
  6. O que pode ser feito para o meu filho que ainda está chupando o dedo?

    A maioria dos especialistas acredita que por volta dos 6 anos de idade, quando os dentes permanentes começam a erupcionar, é o momento adequado para tratar o hábito. É importante interromper o hábito porque este pode empurrar os dentes permanentes para um alinhamento incorreto. Sucção dos dedos estimula protrusão dos dentes superiores. Além disso, também pode estar associado com fala inadequada, stress social e outros hábitos. A remoção destes hábitos são tratados com programas psicológicos e/ou aparelhos bucais. A correção do hábito às vezes não é fácil. Seu dentista deve ser capaz de avaliar e recomendar qual é o método mais adequado para a situação individual do seu filho.
     

  7. Por que meu filho tem duas fileiras de dentes?

    Two Rows of Teeth

    O local mais comum para isso acontecer é na região inferior dos dentes anteriores. Ocorre em 30% das crianças. O aparecimento de duas fileiras de dentes é devido aos dentes permanentes que erupcionam atrás dos dentes decíduos. Isto, geralmente é causado por uma discrepância entre o tamanho dos dentes permanentes, e o espaço disponível para que cresçam. Seu dentista deve ser consultado. Uma radiografia se faz necessária para determinar quanto de raiz do dente decíduos ainda resta. Às vezes, os dentes decíduos precisam ser removidos, mas caso estes já se encontrem soltos, eles cairão após algumas semanas.

  8. Por que o meu filho tem um espaço largo entre os dentes permanentes anteriores?

    Um espaço largo, geralmente é notado quando os dois dentes anteriores superiores erupcionam. Este espaço é chamado de diastema, e é uma parte normal do desenvolvimento da maxila. À medida que os outros dentes erupcionam, este espaço tende a fechar. O espaço normalmente se fecha perto da adolescência. Na maioria das vezes, a presença de um diastema antes dos 12 anos é uma indicação que os dentes permanentes terão bastante espaço para crescer de forma reta. No entanto, pode haver outras causas para a existência deste espaço entre os dentes anteriores, se fazendo necessário uma investigação através de raios-x pelo seu dentista com o objetivo de descartar qualquer outro problema em potencial.
     
  9. Muitas crianças têm dentes faltando?

    Cerca de 1 em 20 pessoas têm variações no número de dentes. Algumas têm dentes extras e outras têm dentes ausentes. Dentes ausentes são mais comuns na dentição permanente do que na dentição decídua. Algumas pessoas têm apenas um ou dois dentes faltando. Pode ser que não haja nenhuma razão aparente para esta ocorrência, ou pode ser algo comum entre os membros da família. Algumas pessoas têm inúmeros dentes faltando. Isto pode estar relacionado a algum tipo de condição sistêmica. Seu dentista pode ajudar a fazer um plano de tratamento para gerenciar o espaço, de forma que as crianças possam se manter em função adequada; pode-se também coordenar o tratamento com um ortodontista para manipular adequadamente o espaço e realizar uma possível substituição a longo prazo.
  10. Why do children need sealants?

    Sealants

    Quando os primeiros dentes erupcionam na cavidade bucal, eles estão em maior risco de desenvolver cárie dentária. Os molares permanentes são os dentes que mais se beneficiam na obtenção de selantes. Os primeiros molares nascem por volta dos 6 anos de idade e na maioria das vezes têm sulcos profundos nas superfícies da mastigação. A escovação muitas vezes não é suficiente para limpar esses sulcos corretamente, então ao longo dos anos muitos destes molares poderão desenvolver cárie dentária. O selante é um revestimento protetor que preenche os sulcos profundos nas superfícies da mastigação dos dentes posteriores, evitando desta forma acúmulo de alimento. Uma superfície lisa torna a limpeza dentária mais fácil de limpar, prevenindo a cárie dentária! Selantes são considerados seguro, e eficazes para evitar cáries nas superfícies da mastigação dos dentes posteriores. Selantes são geralmente colocados nos dentes permanentes, mas se as crianças estiver em risco de desenvolver cáries nas superfícies da mastigação dos dentes decíduos, o uso do selante nesta dentição também é considerado eficaz.
  11. Meu filho precisa de um protetor bucal para praticar esportes?

    Protetores bucais ajudam a diminuir lesões na boca e dentes. Eles são usados em muitos esportes onde possibilidade de injúria.Protetores bucais podem ser confeccionados através de um molde para ajustar aos dentes do seu filho ou podem ser comprados comercialmente. O protetor bucal personalizado é usado no arco superior, tornando a comunicação da criança mais fácil, além de oferecer melhor proteção. No entanto, é mais prático comprar protetores bucais comerciais para uma criança de 6 a 9 anos, uma vez que nessa faixa etária os dentes estão constantemente caindo e sendo substituído. Os protetores mais caros são os que são utilizados nas crianças que já tem todos os dentes permanentes no lugar. Estes protetores também podem ser feitos e são bastante recomendados para crianças que usam aparelhos.
     

  12. Se uma criança tem dentes decídus ruins, ela também terá dentes permanentes ruins?

    Este não precisa de ser o caso. Para se ter cárie dental precisamos de dentes, bactérias na boca e alimentos doces. Grande número de bactérias e ingestão regular de alimentos doces sem imediata escovação é uma perfeita receita para a formação da cárie dental. Infelizmente, hábitos de comer doces e beber líquidos açucarados com freqüência, sem realizar a escovação com pasta dental com flúor pode muitas vezes persistir por um longo período de tempo. Estes hábitos podem acabar  acarretando desenvolvimento da cárie dental nos dentes decíduos, e, posteriormente nos dentes permanents. As crianças que têm cáries em seus dentes decíduos têm mais chances de desenvolver cáries nos seus dentes permanentes. No entanto, mudança no estilo de vida com uma dieta nutritiva que limita o açúcar, uma escovação adequada duas vezes por dia com creme dental com flúor e visitas odontológicas regulares podem alterar completamente o ambiente bucal, dando aos dentes permanentes a oportunidade para crescerem de forma saudável, mesmo quando a dentição decídua apresentava-se desfavorável.

 

The International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) is a non-profit organization founded in 1969, with the objective to contribute to the progress and promotion of oral health for children around the globe.

Read more

IAPD has now 64 National Member Societies and represents more than 15,000 dentists.

cron web_use_log